Artists in Residence

Photo: E A`a Mua Pehe Pueo La is the product of the King Kekaulike APP-AIR program where students designed and produced the mural.

E A`a Mua Pehe Pueo La is the product of the King Kekaulike APP-AIR program where students designed and produced the mural in collaboration with commissioned artist, Bob Flint.

 

The Art in Public Places — Artists in Residence (APP-AIR) Program is a collaborative program between the Department of Education (DOE) and the Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts (HSFCA). The program was established to implement an integrated visual arts in education program, while providing commissioned works of art in public schools. Funding is made available through the HSFCA Works of Art Special Fund, under Section 103-8.5 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes.

Program funds allow for the participation of approximately four school projects per year. Each project will be budgeted with a maximum of $100,000 for middle, intermediate, or high schools and $75,000 for elementary schools, to hire the services of a professional visual artist as chosen by the Art Advisory Committee (AAC). The AAC for each school is composed of five members, including the school’s principal, one teacher, one student, one community member, and one HSFCA commissioner. The school selects the teacher, community member, and student representative, and the HSFCA Board of Commissioners selects the commissioner.

The AAC, representing the larger school and community population, is guided through the process of selecting an appropriate site and style of artwork for their school campus. Artists appropriate to the project are recommended from artists who have sent in a qualified application through the online website www.CallforEntry.org, Café. The AAC recommends an artist from this group to the HSFCA Board of Commissioners, and works collaboratively with the selected artist on the concept of the artwork for their school. All recommendations are made to the HSFCA Board to satisfy state laws and agency requirements.

Culminating works of art at the school might include sculpture fashioned out of metal, stone, glass, concrete, or wall murals created with ceramic and/or mosaic tiles, metal, glass, or concrete. The budget is paid directly to the artist in phases. There are five phases delineated in the contract, spreading over an estimated two-year period of the project. The DOE’s APP-AIR Resource Teacher coordinates and attends all meetings. The HSFCA manages the contracts and payments to artists for all projects, alleviating these burdens from the schools.

Program Goals

  • Teaming among a professional artist, teachers, students, and the school community to develop a work of art in the school, which reflects and is appropriate to the school’s environment, curriculum, cultural values, and aesthetics.
  • Providing meaningful and authentic experiences for students and staff to learn the processes of conceptualization, design, decision-making, production, and evaluation of works of art, while building capacity of teachers to incorporate or infuse art into school curriculum.

The APP-AIR project includes an educational component that is integrated into the school’s curriculum. As part of the educational component, the artist is required to provide a residency in the school equivalent to 14-16 days of instruction during the term of the project. The AAC decides on the appropriate grade level or classes that will have the benefit of direct contact with the selected artist. The DOE’s APP-AIR Resource Teacher is available to assist the artist and principal in formulating lesson plans for teachers and students.

Additionally, the artist must conduct a minimum of one in-service training workshop for teachers, one presentation to the school and community, and one studio visit for a select number of students and teachers (only if the studio is safe and conducive for such a visit).