It’s Your Art: No. 1 Capitol District Building

Posted on Apr 11, 2018 in Art in Public Places, Art in Public Places Collection, Blog Post, Email Newsletter

View of the ground floor display case in the No.1 Capitol District Building

The ground floor display case in the No. 1 Capitol District Building (which houses the SFCA office, Hawaii State Art Museum, and several other state government offices) now features works by local artists Yvonne Yarber Carter, Keoki Apokolani Carter, Daven Hee and Jason Teraoka.

"Merchant and Richards: You Can Park Here, She's Not a Meter Maid" by Yvonne Yarber Carter and Keoki Apokolani Carter. Photograph.

“Merchant and Richards: You Can Park Here, She’s Not a Meter Maid” / Yvonne Yarber Carter and Keoki Apokolani Carter / photograph and video / 2017 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

The Carters’ photo and video piece is an artistic interpretation of experiences in downtown Honolulu, a microcosm of change through the last two centuries in Hawaiʻi. The piece was inspired by recent visits to O‘ahu by Keoki and Yvonne which prompted feelings of loss, incongruity, compassion, love, rich memories and worry. Using imagery in the piece, and original sounds and music, the artists acknowledge a collective responsibility and the hope that our hearts are not lost.

"Train: Engine" by Daven Hee

“Train: Engine” / Daven Hee / glazed stoneware / 2008 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Train: Flatbed with Vehicle #2, Daven Hee

“Train: Flatbed with Vehicle #2” / Daven Hee / glazed stoneware / 2008 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

"Train" Daven Hee

“Train” / Daven Hee / glazed stoneware / 2008 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Hee’s Train consists of twenty ceramic cars, each constructed of several individually thrown and meticulously crafted pieces (the leading engine alone is made up of approximately seventy separate components). Toys are a frequent theme for Hee, who also makes vessels and functional pottery.

"Hey Pineapple" Jason Teraoka

“Hey Pineapple” / Jason Teraoka / acrylic and India ink on cotton vellum paper / 2010 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

"Just Bitter" Jason Teraoka

“Just Bitter” / Jason Teraoka / acrylic and India ink on cotton vellum paper / 2010 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Series of works by Jason Teraoka

Teraoka, in this series, animates vintage toys, dolls, cartoon characters, uniquely shaped rocks and figurines, aiming to capture a sense of personality in each object. The artist describes his challenge: “With my figurative paintings I can rely more on human expression – a twist of the lip or the squint of an eye – to portray emotion of experience. In these ‘portraits’ of objects, I am still trying to capture something of an inner spirit.”

For more information about the history and purpose of the Art in Public Places Program: Art in Public Places Program Purpose & History.

The Art in Public Places Collection can be viewed online and searched by artist name, artwork title, type of media, and more. To begin browsing: Art in Public Places Online Catalog

You can also search the Public Art Archive for permanently installed artworks in the collection, such as sculptures at public buildings. To begin browsing: Public Art Archive

A version of this article was originally published in the April 2018 issue of the SFCA eNews email newsletter.