Sculpture Lobby Refresh, December 2018

The Hawaiʻi State Art Museum’s Sculpture Lobby has recently been refreshed with a new display of glass sculptures from the Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts.

Artworks in the Sculpture Lobby

"Blue Axis" glass sculpture by Alan Patrick Ness

“Blue Axis” / Alan Patrick Ness / blown glass / 2018 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Red glass sculpture

“Basaltic Bliss” / Alan Patrick Ness / blown glass / 2018 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

“Blue Axis” and “Basaltic Bliss,” both by Alan Patrick Ness, were acquired from “Arrangements in Glass: Alan P. Ness” at the Honolulu Museum of Art at First Hawaiian Center exhibit, which closed in September 2018.

Two glass vessels, one bright orange and one light blue.

“Blue and Orange Whiskey Jugs” / Mark Mitsuda / glass / 2006 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Three glass vessels in front of a window.

“Ceremonial Vessel Grouping” / Geoff Lee / blown glass with applied silver leaf / 2013 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Glass vessel in front of a window.

“Amethyst & Topaz Botanical” / Rick Mills / blown and solid formed glass / 2014 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

Two people standing next to a group of glass vessels, in front of a window.

“Bottle Composition (#7, #8, #9)” and “Bottle Composition (#3) / Boyd Sugiki / blown glass / 2005 / Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

About the Art in Public Places Collection

The Hawaii State Art Museum does not have its own collection; the museum was created as a venue for the Art in Public Places Collection, most of which is on display in state buildings, including libraries, schools, and state offices. The Art in Public Places Program (APP Program) was established in 1967 with the enactment of the Art in State Buildings Law, which designated one percent of the construction costs of new buildings for the acquisition of works of art, either by commission or purchase. The program was created to strengthen the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ capability to stimulate, guide and promote culture and the arts through the field of the visual arts. The APP Program seeks to enhance the environmental quality of state public buildings and spaces throughout the state for the enjoyment and enrichment of the public; cultivate the public’s awareness, understanding and appreciation of visual arts in all media, styles and techniques; contribute toward the development and recognition of a professional artistic community; and acquire, interpret, preserve and display works of art expressive of the character of the Hawaiian Islands, the multicultural heritage of its people, and the various creative interests of its artists.

How Artwork is Acquired

To learn more about how artwork is acquired for the Art in Public Places Collection, please go to: Relocatable Works of Art.

Search the Art in Public Places Collection

The Art in Public Places Collection can be viewed online and searched by artist name, artwork title, type of media, and more: click here to search the Art in Public Places Collection online catalog. You can also click here to search the Public Art Archive for permanently placed works in the APP Collection, as well as many other collections nationwide, or click here to use the Public Art Archives’ Locate Public Art web app to find public art near you.