“E Huli I Ka ‘Ike (Look for the Knowledge)” at Kualapu‘u Public Conversion Charter School by Kazu Kauinana

Posted on Aug 29, 2019 in Art in Public Places, Blog Post, Commissioned Works of Art, It's Your Art

“E Huli I Ka ‘Ike (Look for the Knowledge)” at Kualapu‘u Public Conversion Charter School by Kazu Kauinana

“E Huli I Ka ‘Ike (Look for the Knowledge)” a bronze sculpture by Kazu Kauinana, has been dedicated at Kualapu‘u Public Conversion Charter School (Kualapu‘u, Moloka‘i).

Photo of artwork in front of school.

>“E Huli I Ka ‘Ike (Look for the Knowledge)” by Kazu Kauinana, bronze sculpture, 2019. Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts.

About the Artwork

E Huli I Ka ‘Ike was created to inspire students. The child figure looks toward the future and holds a book or tablet signifying education, technology and growth. The solid support provided by the kupuna holding an ‘o‘o bar shows the connection to the culture and the community. The outstretched arm forms a gesture of support, encouragement and nurturing.

About the Artist

Kazu Fukuda Kauinana earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Hawai‘i in 1972 and his Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture from the University of Colorado in 1974. In 1979 Kazu’s curiosity lured him to New York City where he lived for 13 years. He worked in several interesting jobs that helped him learn about art from fabricating dinosaur exhibits at the Museum of Natural History to building props and sculptures for television and print publications at Manhattan Model Works. He returned to Hawaii in 1991 and taught art in private and public schools until 2012. Kazu has created 6 public sculptures for the State of Hawai‘i.

About the Art Advisory Committee

The Art Advisory Committee for this work of art was Lydia Trinidad (Chair), Michael Moore, Helen Kekalia, Nathalie Hosten, and Diane Abraham. The role of the Art Advisory Committee is to make recommendations to the SFCA regarding the development and design of a given art project, including location, medium, distinguishing features of the artwork, and selection of the artist. The SFCA appoints members of the Art Advisory Committee from users of the facility and representatives from the community in which the facility is located. The committee chairperson is a representative of the state department, division or agency to which that state building or space is assigned. Others from the committee who serve as a resource or advisory member may include some or all of the following: the project architect, representatives of the state comptroller, representatives of state departments that are responsible for the construction or renovation, representatives of the APP Program, and as appropriate, SFCA-appointed artists or technical experts. The SFCA determines the method in which the art project should be commissioned.

About the Location

Kualapu‘u Public Conversion Charter School is in Kualapu‘u on the island of Moloka‘i.

Funding

The sculpture was funded through the Art in Public Places Program of the SFCA, which receives one percent of the construction and renovation costs for state buildings to integrate art into the built environment of Hawai‘i.
The Art in Public Places Program (APP Program) was created to strengthen the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ capability to stimulate, guide and promote culture and the arts through the field of the visual arts. The APP Program seeks to: enhance the environmental quality of state public buildings and spaces throughout the state for the enjoyment and enrichment of the public; cultivate the public’s awareness, understanding and appreciation of visual arts in all media, styles and techniques; contribute toward the development and recognition of a professional artistic community; and acquire, interpret, preserve and display works of art expressive of the character of the Hawaiian Islands, the multicultural heritage of its people, and the various creative interests of its artists. Artwork in the Art in Public Places Collection can be viewed online in the Art in Public Places online catalog as well as the Public Art Archive (www.publicartarchive.org).